83

Singapore

 

This restaurant is an exercise in hand crafted and unique dining. The design concept is purely based on interpretating of the chef’s experimental and intensely refined approach to food. Notion of hand rafted were in turn looped back to the steam punk aesthetic, the end result of the design is modern and subtle in its articulation. The details are then something to be discovered through the experience itself, revealing an undeniable connection between the design and the food.  The intention is that the two should work together to enhance the total experience. Burnt oak, bronze and leather materials lend a warm feel. Aspects of steampunk design emphasise a balance between the form and function.[20] So too is it like the Arts and Crafts Movement. But John Ruskin, William Morris, and the other reformers in the late nineteenth century rejected machines and industrial production. On the other hand, steampunk enthusiasts present a “non-luddite critique of technology.”

Various modern utilitarian objects have been modified by enthusiasts into a pseudo-Victorian mechanical “steampunk” style.[7][22] Example objects include computer keyboards and electric guitars.[23] The goal of such redesigns is to employ appropriate materials (such as polished brass, iron, wood, and leather) with design elements and craftsmanship consistent with the Victorian era,[14][24] rejecting the aesthetic of industrial design.

In 1994, the Paris Metro station at Arts et Métiers was redesigned by Belgian artist Francois Schuiten in steampunk style to honour the works of Jules Verne. The station is reminiscent of a submarine, sheathed in brass with giant cogs in the ceiling and portholes that look out onto fanciful scenes.

Steampunk may, therefore, be described as neo-Victorian. Steampunk perhaps most recognisably features anachronistic technologies or retro-futuristic inventions as people in the 19th century might have envisioned them, and is likewise rooted in the era’s perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, and art. Such technology may include fictional machines like those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or the modern authors Philip Pullman, Scott Westerfeld, Stephen Hunt and China Miéville. Other examples of steampunk contain alternative history-style presentations of such technology as lighter-than-air airships, analogue computers, or such digital mechanical computers as Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine.

Steampunk may also incorporate additional elements from the genres of fantasy, horror, historical fiction, alternate history, or other branches of speculative fiction, making it often a hybrid genre. The term steampunk’s first known appearance was in 1987, though it now retroactively refers to many works of fiction created even as far back as the 1950s or 1960s.